Saturday, March 2, 2013

Mozart's Sister and some reflections


 "Hope is the thing with feathers
  That perches in the soul,
 And sings the tune without words,
 And never stops at all."
Emily Dickinson

  First some more good news! My short story "The Broken Wing of Your Ideal" was selected for the Freedom Forge Press Anthology, which will be released in July 2013.
 Dear followers, thank you so much for your ongoing support! It means a lot to me.
 A few days ago I watched the movie Mozart's Sister.After watching this movie I wondered about all the talent that has been squandered for so long. Scientists, artists, writers, musicians. Have you ever thought about this?

  Even today, in many cultures, being a woman still means being a second-class citizen.
  In Saudi Arabia, a rich nation, women need permission from their husbands- or a male relative if they don't have a spouse - to work, study or travel. They are not allowed to drive, and millions of them are not allowed to practice sports.
  Last January people took to the streets to demand reforms, but they were intimidated, punished and harassed by the government. As I write this, more people are detained for protesting. You can read about this matter here:
 http://www.cnn.com/2013/03/01/world/meast/saudi-arabia-protest/

  Not too long ago, a woman was almost killed in Pakistan for supporting education for girls..
  In many cultures, having  a baby girl is considered a bad situation. Girls are less likely to have access to  education. They are denied property rights and are forced to marry young.  An interim report from the Global Campaign of Education  states that girls cited parental preference for their male siblings. To read more on this, check this link:
http://www.campaignforeducation.org/en/campaigns/gender-discrimination
www.theirc.org

   In certain countries and cultures, thousands of little girls are subjected to genital mutilation (clitoridectomy or infibulation), a procedure performed without anesthesia, and associated with several complications including infections, bleeding and chronic pain.
  If you think that gender discrimination is a problem of the past where you live, think again. Are you not biased by the idea of gender? A study done at Yale  showed that both men and women faculty were equally biased by gender when they assessed their students. Here is the link to the study.
  "Female faculty members were just as likely as their male colleagues to favor the male student. The fact that faculty members’ bias was independent of their gender, scientific discipline, age, and tenure status suggests that it is likely unintentional, generated from widespread cultural stereotypes rather than a conscious intention to harm women."
Not surprisingly, there is a study that shows that there is disparity between men and women in the workplace. Women earn less money for working the same number of hours, and the more hours they work the less they make compared to their male counterparts.

   So when does the problem start? Pre-school perhaps?
   The first step to end gender discrimination is to acknowledge it. Both men and women are responsible for eradicating the biases from their minds.
   It is a work in progress...



19 comments:

  1. And these are reasons why I think International Women's Day is so important and why I am proud to consider myself a feminist.

    Take care
    x

    ReplyDelete
  2. First off, congrats on your short story being selected for the anthology!!!

    Secondly, thank you for bringing awareness to soemthing that DEFINITELY needs more awareness. I think the problem starts very very early in life and should be addressed as early as pre-school in terms of education.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your support, Keith. And yes, I agree with you. We need to be mindful. Have a lovely Sunday.

      Delete
  3. Happy to hear the news about your short story!

    As an active member of the United Methodist Women, I am aware of this gender inequality. Such a tragedy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for commenting and for sharing your experience, Nellie.

      Delete
  4. It's a problem, no doubt about it. The solution to the problem is to first admit it's a problem. Each individual person has to take that on himself/herself.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Surprisingly, there are many people out there who either minimize it or deny it...

      Delete
  5. Congrats on your story being selected for the anthology! That is exciting news!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, leigh. Yes, I look forward to this anthology.

      Delete
  6. Congratulations on your story, Julia! I remember reading - and enjoying - it some time ago and I'm so happy to hear it will be published! Too true about women as second-class citizens. I work with developing countries and see this so often. But I agree its embedded in our own culture as well. This has also been an object of discussion in literature. Male authors still get the lion's share of reviews and accolades. It's nice to see some female authors starting to challenge the status quo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Kimberly. You are right and gave me more food for thought. There IS discrimination in the literary world too. It is disturbing.

      Delete
  7. Congratulations for your new upcoming publication,Julia!! The tittle is amazing and makes me think about the story,too.

    I like your description about the big macho problem all around the world. I truly believe in the courage of the women .The work is no done ,yet. There is a long way to go...

    ReplyDelete
  8. Congratulations Julia!!!

    Genital mutilation is something that gets the hairs on my back stand up. It's not ok and the more people fighting to stop it the better. Xx

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hey, Julia.

    At your recommendation, I checked out this post. (And thanks for the recommendation!) I'm old enough that I've seen a huge reduction in blatant sexism in the US in my lifetime, but as you point out, we still have a long way to go. The way women are treated in some parts of the world is horrifying, and what's even worse is many of those women think the way they're being treated is acceptable because that's the way it's always been. Culture change is traditionally slow, and when the culture is deeply connected to an extreme religion that supports treating women as "less than", the change is gonna be even tougher. Let's hope the changes stirring in the Middle East will facilitate more freedom and equality for females in those societies.

    Oh... and congrats on your short story making it into the anthology!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Susan. I believe religions in general play an important role in this matter...
      Thanks for your insightful comment.

      Delete
    2. Thanks, Susan. I believe religions in general play an important role in this matter...
      Thanks for your insightful comment.

      Delete

I appreciate each and every comment. Thank you.