Friday, October 17, 2014

Tin House


On browsing literary magazines at Barnes & Noble I came across Tin House. The cover was intriguing and enticing, but there was much more to it.
  It was one of those days when concentration drifts away easily and worries grip the mind. Yet as soon as I began reading one of its short stories I was enthralled. I knew I had to read it till the end. One paragraph brought me to the next with ease. I could not put it down. I was hooked.
  The  first story I read was "Mr. Voice" by Jess Walter. It had quirky characters and there were twists that I did not expect. It flowed well and there were no descriptions that bogged it down. It made me laugh.
   I later read  essays, poems and other stories from Tin House and I was not disappointed.
   Above all, I love the essays. The themes resonate; honesty shines through them for they have the simplicity and the complexity of human experience.  Tin House helped me to learn a lot about the society I live in.  Diving into it is like finding a treasure of interesting anecdotes, insightful reflections and thought-provoking situations that strike a chord, so if you are thinking of reading a literary magazine, try Tin House.
  Just in case you are wondering about the art cover, let me tell you that it was created by Emily Winfield Martin, a Portland artist. Her artwork explores "the implications of masks... personas and disguises." It addresses ideas of belonging and hints at the strange relationships found among kinfolk.

 Tin House is a house where the untold dares to be told.

12 comments:

  1. Hi Julia - I see it's a quarterly ... so you'll have lots of interesting ideas to read. It looks a really fascinating collection. The cover certain beguiles ... I think I saw a couple of Emily's masks on the website ...

    What a great find ... and enjoy in the future .. cheers Hilary

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    1. Thanks, Hilary.
      I haven't finished reading it yet.

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  2. Sounds - and looks - interesting.

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  3. I tried to get as much information from that fascinating cover, as my dim eyesight will allow. Young girls with long skinny legs, modern-type dresses and wearing animal masks. But I couldn't get a take on what it signifies. What does it mean to you? You spark a real interest in the stories (as usual) . The title "Tin House" must have some definite meaning for a literary magazine, too.
    I do love your reviews. I don't know exactly how to say this .....but your open a door and give your reader such a curious peep as to what is inside that we can't wait to enter that door, too.

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    1. Thank you for your encouraging feedback, Manzanita. The issue is about tribes and masks. There is so much interesting stuff about our societies. It is enlightening in many ways.
      One of my favorite essays is called "A Different World" by Tayari Jones. Another outstanding essay is "The Plot" by Elissa Altman. Thought-provoking and touching.

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  4. Hi Julia,
    I’ve been away for much of Sept and Oct due to family business (I was able to get a little vacation in there too!), and I’ve been missing so many posts. Haven’t even blogged for a few months but hope to start again soon. Wanted to say “hi” again!

    “Tin House is a house where the untold dares to be told,” now that is intriguing! Definitely sounds like a literary magazine worth exploring. The cover art is enticing too. What a great discovery and thank you for bringing it to our attention.

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    1. Yes, that's my definition. Tin House is a house where the untold dares to be told.
      Welcome back, Jersey! I love to read your comments!
      Thank you for reading my posts.

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  5. An intriguing looking book, thank you for sharing it!

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    1. You are welcome.
      Thank you for stopping by.

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  6. Great review of this magazine. I've often wondered about it.

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